Silicon Gold Rush: The Next Generation of High-Tech Stars Rewrites the Rules of Business

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Silicon Gold Rush: The Next Generation of High-Tech Stars Rewrites the Rules of Business

Silicon Gold Rush: The Next Generation of High-Tech Stars Rewrites the Rules of Business

A hotbed of activity for far-sighted thinkers and determined doers, the high technology industry has given rise to a pioneering group of entrepreneurs and executives which is not only behind today’s most innovative technological advances, but at the forefront of a dynamic new movement in business. Armed with groundbreaking management philosophies and practices, the members of this visionary group are changing the way corporate structures are modeled and altering conventional conceptions of how c

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3 Comments on "Silicon Gold Rush: The Next Generation of High-Tech Stars Rewrites the Rules of Business"

  1. Tom von Alten "Tom von Alten" | May 29, 2015 at 8:07 am | Reply
    8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
    1.0 out of 5 stars
    Let me catch my breath, February 19, 2000
    By 
    Tom von Alten “Tom von Alten” (Boise, ID USA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    There are enough self-proclaimed “management bestsellers,” and this one is too effusive and devoid of original content, from the boxed pundit words of wisdom, to the “terrific” blurbs from the people glowingly spotlighted within. Southwick’s myopia is perhaps best captured by her claim that “the Regis Touch” transformed Apple. Maybe it was too long ago to remember, but back then, having an actual product made a difference. The idea that things are now moving so fast that intellectual property doesn’t matter any more is ludicrous.
    The work seems primarily descriptive, rather than prescriptive, making it ironically backward-looking, and already dated.

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  2. 3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    But for one major shortcoming, a valuable read!, April 21, 1999
    By A Customer
    This book is about success, management, and the hitech business. It seeks to identify a number of ‘success factors’ through interviewing and analysing the strategies and methodologies of a selection of hitech companies. As such, it seems well researched and argued, and resembles the approach of the now classic ‘In search of excellence'(ISOE). However, its weakness is to ignore one of its own conclusions, and not include ‘professional management’ as a success factor, i.e. the equivalent of perhaps ISOE’s ‘Hands on Value driven’ success factor! Therefore, Silicon Gold Rush ultimately itemises an organisational wish list without incorporating the one factor capable of delivering business success: professional management! Despite the above weakness, the book is nevertheless an interesting read. Callum Morrison

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  3. 2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Right on the money, April 12, 1999
    By A Customer
    The paint-blistering speed of wealth creation in high tech’s Internet era has created an almost mind-numbing buzz around stock options, paradigm shifts, and huge fortunes appearing overnight in the bank accounts of bright young things. Many of the books about the heady adventures of successful startups (and never mind the many that fizzle) fall into the category of business bodice rippers. In “Silicon Gold Rush,” Karen Southwick eschews romance and takes another approach: She looks at the way successful new companies and their revolutionary leaders have changed forever the way business will be done in the new millennium . Though it’s far too simple to call this excellent book “Boom Times for Dummies,” Southwick strips the romantic filigree from the technology gold rush and gets right down to what we can learn about running any business from those who are making it big out on the bleeding edge. With clear writing and clear thinking, she has actually produced something that is far less “gee whiz” and far more “why not you?” than has been published in quite a while. And if it’s slightly annoying the way she sprinkles bits of wisdom throughout the pages like so many salted peanuts, at least the bits she chooses really are wise. Southwick obviously knows her way around Silicon Valley, and she’s awfully good at panning for ideas as good as gold.
    Owen Edwards, co-author with Jim Clark of Netscape Time: the inside story of the billion-dollar startup that took on Microsoft. (St. Martin’s Press, June `99)

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